News

An update from our affiliate, AFM 40-543...........................................................

Donna S. Edwards, president of the Maryland State and DC AFL-CIO speaks during a Workers Memorial Day service at the UAW hall in Maugansville. 

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old.

Anthony Ngo, AFSCME Local 2620 member, purchased a new Chevy Volt with the Union Plus Auto Buying program. Because he purchased a union-made green car** he was eligible for additional savings through Union Plus.

The Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO has more than 600 affiliated local unions, representing 340,000 union members in public sector, education, trades and construction, entertainment, manufacturing, transportation, health care, retail, hospitality, and other industries. We work to strengthen and build unions, for the right of all people to be free from employment discrimination, to be treated fairly, to earn family sustaining wages with secured retirement and affordable health care, and to be safe at work.

HB 166 (Fight for Fifteen) passed the House of Delegates last week with a vote of 96-44. This is significant progress in getting Maryland’s minimum wage increased. Unfortunately, the bill was amended to carve out tipped workers and agricultural workers. Tomorrow morning, 3/7/19, at 8:30am, the Senate Finance Committee is planning on taking up the House version of the bill, and amending it to exempt all businesses with 15 workers or less from paying the minimum wage.

Last year, in communities all across the country, millions of Americans mobilized and called for an economy that works for all of us. From state houses and governors mansions to Capitol Hill, we elected advocates who committed themselves to advancing that cause. That election was defined by a movement of hard working people who stood together to reject the meager crumbs we are being handed and reclaim what is rightfully ours.

If an investor was searching for the country’s most explosively successful commodity, they might look to the ground for natural resources or to Wall Street for some new financial instrument. But, the most meteoric success story can be found virtually all around us—in the booming video game industry. Growing by double digits, U.S. video game sales reached $43 billion in 2018, about 3.6 times greater than the film industry’s record-breaking box office.

More workers were involved in strikes and other labor disputes in 2018 than at any point in the past three decades, fueled by widespread teacher protests last spring, according to data released Friday by the Labor Department.

Read more from the Wall Street Journal.

I understand why it would be insane to spend even a day without controllers, troops, Transportation Security Administration screeners, Coast Guard officers, FBI and Border Patrol agents and a laundry list of other truly essential workers employed by the federal government. What I don’t understand is why we tolerate a system that lets elected officials fail to do their one real job — funding the government — with no consequences for anyone in power.

Something funny happened on the way to the labor movement’s funeral.